1. opticoverload:

    Water Drops 

    (via derangedbutterfly)

     
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  3. Creep (c) Skye Kelly
    Creep (c) Skye Kelly
    Creep (c) Skye Kelly
    Creep (c) Skye Kelly
    Creep (c) Skye Kelly
    Creep (c) Skye Kelly

    fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

    Artist Skye Kelly’s “Creep (strain)” sculpture shown above is made from toffee. The viscous fluid deforms under the force of gravity, resulting in elongated drips and slow jets that buckle and coil upon reaching the floor. (Photo credits: Skye Kelly; via freshphotons)

     
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  6. unknownskywalker:

    Water drop photography by Corrie White

     
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  8. ianbrooks:

    Liquid Rorschach by Jan Willem Nieuwenhuize and Peet Stolk

    Using photomanip magic, hi-speed photography, and harnassing the innate chaotic nature liquid, Jan and Peet managed to create these amazing inkblot-esque pictures, filled with butterflies, nuclear explosions, and two bears high-fiving. Check out the entire series at Jan’s behance.

     
  9. Buckingham and Bush 2001
    Buckingham and Bush 2001
    Buckingham and Bush 2001

    fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

    When a falling liquid jet hits a horizontal impacter, it is deflected into a sheet. The shape of the sheet is dependent upon the velocity of the jet and the viscosity of the fluid. At sufficiently high speeds the sheet will be circular; at lower speeds it may sag into a bell-shape. The circular sheets can also develop an instability that causes them to become polygonal, as shown in the photos above. The fluid then flows out along the sheet, into and along the rim, and then spouts outward in jets at the polygon’s corners. For some conditions, the jets at the corners even form a sort of fluid chain (top photo). (Photo credit: R. Buckingham and J. W. M. Bush; via 14-billion-years-later

     
  10. Shawn Knol ~ Ferrofluid